General Information

Looking to subdivide your land? Want to remove some trees or build another home on your property? Interested in pursuing a large development project in the City of Bonney Lake? The City offers many services to assist you in your plans.  For more information please contact City staff.  

Services

Boundary Line Adjustments
A boundary line adjustment is used to legally modify existing property lines and must be prepared by a licensed surveyor. There are three primary reasons for a boundary line adjustment. First, a property owner may be required to consolidate internal property lines; typically this occurs when historic lot lines span a single building site. Second, a property owner may be resolving an encroachment issue due to the construction of a building or other structures on an adjacent lot. Finally, a property owner may desire to realign or reorientate an existing lot(s) to modify the buildable area or create additional buildable area. A boundary line adjustment cannot create a new tract, parcel or lot. Please see Chapter 17.30 BLMC for more information on the boundary line adjustment procedure.
Clearing and Tree Removal Permits
The City does require the issuance of permits for the removal of tree and other vegetation unless the work is listed as exempt in BLMC 16.13.020. The reason that clearing permits are required in certain cases is to ensure that the community continues to benefit from a substantial tree canopy which has positive impacts on the health of the community and improves the property values in the community. Tree retention has consistent been identified as an important value to the residents of Bonney Lake. To determine if a clearing permit is required or if information is required to be provided to the City please contact the Planning and Building Division using the contact information to the left.
Critical Areas
With passage of the Growth Management Act (GMA), local jurisdictions throughout Washington State, including the City, were required to develop policies and regulations to designate and protect critical areas. Critical areas, as defined by RCW 36.70A.030(5), include wetlands, areas with a critical recharging effect on aquifers used for potable water, fish and wildlife habitat conservation areas, frequently flooded areas, and geologically hazardous areas (e.g. Erosion Hazard Areas, Class 1 and 2 Landslide Hazard Areas, Seismic Hazard Areas, and Volcanic Hazard Areas). Development within (see BLMC 16.20.030 for a definition of “Development”) wetlands, fish and wildlife habitat conservation areas, class 1 landslide hazard areas and the associated buffers is prohibited. Development in other critical areas may allowed, provided that the proposal complies with the substantive standards for that critical area as provided in Title 16 Article II.
Design Review
The design review process is required for all property improvements except for new detached single family homes and accessory structures, installation of wireless communication facilitates, minor alterations to existing commercial buildings. A complete list of property improvements exempted from design review is provided in BLMC 14.95.020. As part of the design review process the City will review the conceptual design of the building and site to ensure that the project will promote quality design throughout the City and determine if the proposal is consistent with the City’s adopted development regulations.
Downtown Design Guidelines.
Setbacks
New structures and buildings are required to comply with the setbacks established for each zoning district. Additionally, if the plat or short plat that created your lot contains setbacks, new buildings and structures are required to comply with these setbacks in addition to the setback established for the zoning district. If there is a conflict between the plat/short plat and the zoning standards for a specific property line, the most restrictive setback measured from that property line will govern to ensure compliance with both documents. A property owner needs to ensure that all structures and buildings, even those that do not require a building permit are required to comply with all setback requirements. If you have questions about your setbacks please contact the Planning and Building Division, using the contact information to the left.
Short Subdivisions
In order to divide an existing property or properties into nine or less lots, the property owner would need to complete the short subdivision process. The short subdivision process is a three step process that involves approval of a preliminary short plat, civil plans, and a final plat. As part of the preliminary short plat process the City will review the division or redivision of land for compliance with Chapter 17.50 BLMC to ensure that there are adequate provisions for open spaces, drainage, public streets, sidewalks, water supplies, sewer lines, fire protection, power services, parks, and other planning features required to serve the future residents. As part of the preliminary short plat process, the prospective applicant may also be required to apply review under the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), if the division of land includes environmental critical areas, lands covered by water, or requires the moving of more than 500 cubic yards of earthen material. Once the preliminary short pat is approved by the Director or designee, the prospective applicant will then move to the second phase of the process which is civil engineering. During this phase the final engineering details of the short subdivision will be reviewed and approved by the City. Once the infrastructure improvements are complete, the prospective applicant would then apply for final short plat approval, which once approved will officially create the new lots once the document is recorded with Pierce County. The final shot plat is approved administratively. Please see Chapter 17.20 BLMC for more information on the short subdivision process.
Subdivisions
In order to divide an existing property or properties into ten or more lots, the property owner would need to complete the subdivision process. The subdivision process is a three step process that involves approval of a preliminary plat, civil plans, and a final plat. As part of the preliminary plat process the City will review the division or redivision of land for compliance with Chapter 17.50 BLMC to ensure that there are adequate provisions for open spaces, drainage, public streets, sidewalks, water supplies, sewer lines, fire protection, power services, parks, and other planning features required to serve the future residents. As part of the preliminary subdivision process, the prospective applicant must also apply for review under the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). Once the preliminary subdivision is approved by the Hearing Examiner, the prospective applicant will then move to the second phase of the process which is civil engineering. During this phase the final engineering details of the subdivision will be reviewed and approved by the City. Once the infrastructure improvements are complete, the prospective applicant would then apply for final plat approval, which once approved will officially create the new lots once the document is recorded with Pierce County. The final plat is approved administratively. Please see Chapter 17.20 BLMC for more information on the subdivision process.

Office Hours:
Monday - Thursday
8:30am - 5:00pm
CLOSED FRIDAYS

Contact:
Planning & Building Division

Location:
Justice & Municipal Center
9002 Main ST E, STE 300
Bonney Lake, WA 98391

Mailing:
City of Bonney Lake
Attn: Planning & Building
P.O. Box 7380
Bonney Lake, WA 98391

Phone: 253-447-4356

Fax: 253-862-1116